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Home Inspection Series

Home Inspection Series – Part 1: Inspections 101

Fri, 16th October, 2009 - Posted by Sean Kavanagh - (0) Comment

Welcome to my 8 part series on home inspections. Many home buyers underestimate the importance of a quality home inspection. A big mistake purchasers often make is to search out the cheapest home inspector on the block to conduct this vital stage of the home buying process. It makes not sense to me to have the cheapest guy inspect the largest investment you and your family will ever make. A quality home inspector will have experience in home structure, electrical systems, roofing and heating and cooling. A cheaper home inspector that does not possess this comprehensive knowledge base will miss important faults and flaws in the home that will end up costing you thousands of dollars down the road. Home inspectors are paid to help protect your largest investment, so why would you try to save $100 now on a poor inspection when it could cost you thousands down the road? I don’t know that answer, but many home buyers are making this same mistake.

I have compiled this series on home inspections with the help first time home buyers understand the importance of a home inspection and, even though you have just spent hundreds of thousands of dollars on your new home, spend a little extra to ensure you receive a proper and comprehensive home inspection. A home inspection can do more than just satisfy curiosity – it’s an opportunity to learn as much as possible about your prospective purchase and its hidden potential… or pitfalls

Would you buy a used car privately off someone without having a qualified and objective mechanic give it a thorough once-over? Of course not. So when it comes to one of the most significant purchases you’ll ever make in your life, a proper home inspection is not only necessary – it’s essential.

Homes inspectors check all of the major systems in a home, such as the plumbing, electrical, heating and air conditioning. They’ll also do a visual inspection of the foundation, doors, ceilings, roof, walls, windows, plumbing, ventilation, insulation, sewage system, lot and garage – at the very least. Their services are required to protect your investment and insure there are no structural issues or flaws in the house that you may not be aware of.
Unlike homebuyers themselves, whose observations are partial and often highly emotionally charged, a home inspector performs his role with an unbiased attitude and with the best interests of the customer in mind. By identifying existing or potential areas of concern, the inspection report will help secure your investment, avoid post-closing surprises and provide you with peace of mind. An insightful report is fundamental to ensuring you make the right buying decision.

The process usually takes about three hours, during which time the house is examined from the ground up. The inspection includes observation and, when appropriate, operation of the plumbing, heating, air conditioning, electrical, and appliance systems, as well as structural components such as the roof, attic, foundation, basement, exterior and interior walls, chimney and doors.

According to George Pappas, president of Pappas Home Inspections Inc., Toronto, inspections usually take about three hours for a two-storey detached house, two to three hours for bungalow and one or two hours for a two-bedroom high-rise condo. Costs range similarly, from about $365 for a condo to $425 for a bungalow or detached house (plus GST).

Home inspections cover about 1,000 check-points in approximately 400 items around the home. Findings are usually provided in the form of a comprehensive report, together with a recommended action, AmeriSpec says. It is important that such a report include an objective evaluation of the condition of the home, clearly relating existing defects and indicating potential problems.

For more information on buying or selling real estate in Burlington, Hamilton, Oakville, or Toronto Ontario, or if you have questions about current market trends, mortgages or interest rate information, please visit the Sean Kavanagh Real Estate Resource Centre at www.seansells.ca, or at www.seankavanagh.ca I’d be happy to answer any questions to accommodate all of your real estate needs. Follow me on TWITTER or FACEBOOK! You can also contact me at 905-220-9198 or at www.realestatechat.ca as I am now a moderator on the Ontario Real Estate chat forum as well as the Burlington, Ontario sub-forum.

Sean Kavanagh

Building Lasting Relationships and Exceeding Expectations

Category : Home Inspection Series

Home Inspection Series – Part 2: Educating the Buyer

Thu, 15th October, 2009 - Posted by Sean Kavanagh - (0) Comment

Home buyers need to know what problems exist in the home before they purchase it, they will need to be given information on how much money will be required to make the necessary reparations, as well as how much money they will need to invest in their home within the first five years or so.  A good home inspector will be able to identify all faults and flaws and be able to set out a timeline for when the repairs need to be completed.  A knowledgeable inspector will also be able to tell the buyer approximately how much money they can expect to pay for those repairs.

“Peace of mind,” stresses George Pappas, president of Pappas Home Inspections Inc. “That’s the ultimate benefit of an inspection – gaining confidence and peace of mind.”

When you sign an agreement of purchase and sale, your realtor should always have included a condition on home inspection.  A buyer is usually afforded 5 to 10 days to contract a home inspector to have the home assessed.  The buyer should be given a written report to read over to ensure they are buying a quality home….or at least a home they would be comfortable living in!

There is no formal licensing of home inspectors, but reputable companies adhere to the rigid standards of practice established by the Canadian Association of Home & Property Inspectors.  It is important to trust your realtor and interview their recommended inspector, but also search out your own inspectors to interview.  Be sure you are comfortable with their level of knowledge in the major elements of a home (electrical, structural, mechanical, plumbing and roofing).  This is one of the most important decisions in a real estate transaction and is often overlooked by excited and emotional home buyers.  A bad decision can cost you thousands of dollars in unexpected repairs.

Qualified inspection companies will provide a sample report to substantiate that they abide by industry standards. One of the key guidelines is that ethical inspectors neither perform the repairs nor do they refer clients to repair companies. To do so would be considered a conflict of interest.

It is your right to follow the inspector throughout the assessment so you can learn about the home you are hoping to purchase.  You should always ask the inspector before you hire him if it is OK if you follow him through the house.  Be weary if that is discouraged!   You have the right to be there. Good home inspectors will encourage this, since the buyer will probably need to learn the locations of major valves and shut-offs in their new house.

In summary, understand the importance of the inspection, it is not just a formality in the process.  Interview several inspectors to ensure you are hiring a qualified and highly knowledgable inspector.  Be sure to walk through the home with the inspector to get a clear understanding of how the home works and go through the inspection report with the inspector so you know what needs to be fixed, when it needs to be fixed and how much will it cost to get fixed.

For more information on buying or selling real estate in Burlington, Hamilton, Oakville, or Toronto Ontario, or if you have questions about current market trends, mortgages or interest rate information, please visit the Sean Kavanagh Real Estate Resource Centre at www.seansells.ca, or at www.seankavanagh.ca   I’d be happy to answer any questions to accommodate all of your real estate needs.  Follow me on TWITTER or FACEBOOK!  You can also contact me at 905-220-9198 or at www.realestatechat.ca as I am now a moderator on the Ontario Real Estate chat forum as well as the Burlington, Ontario sub-forum.

Sean Kavanagh

Building Lasting Relationships and Exceeding Expectations

Category : Home Inspection Series

Home Inspection Series – Part 3: Be sure to accompany the Inspector

Wed, 14th October, 2009 - Posted by Sean Kavanagh - (0) Comment

It is essential for all buyers to accompany the home inspector throughout the house.   ”When the client attends the home inspection, our inspector will physically show the client both the areas of concern and the benefits of the home construction. The client has a much better understanding of the quality of the home and a far greater and deeper understanding of what they’re about to get into”, according to George Pappas, president of Pappas Home Inspections Inc.

As you walk through with the inspector, you will see first-hand the condition of each key component of the house and property so you will have a better understanding of your house and of the inspection report.

Be sure to look at all of the findings and determine if the deficiencies are too much to take on.  Learn about the operation of your new home such as how the heating system works, how to control pilot lights, how to turn on various appliances and components, and where the shutoffs are located. This will all save time and avoid frustration in the future. The inspector can point out maintenance needs and procedures and explain how and when to check items needing periodic monitoring e.g. when to change the air filter in the furnace.

Have all of your questions and concerns addressed immediately as they arise. Before the inspection, prepare a list of questions or concerns about the property. Relate these questions to the inspection company in advance to ensure that such matters will be properly addressed.  Bring your list to the inspection to ensure the inspector knows you are also following along and jotting down answers and making notes.  They will be less likely to skip a few points if they know you are following carefully.

For more information on buying or selling real estate in Burlington, Hamilton, Oakville, or Toronto Ontario, or if you have questions about current market trends, mortgages or interest rate information, please visit the Sean Kavanagh Real Estate Resource Centre at www.seansells.ca, or at www.seankavanagh.ca   I’d be happy to answer any questions to accommodate all of your real estate needs.  Follow me on TWITTER or FACEBOOK!  You can also contact me at 905-220-9198 or at www.realestatechat.ca as I am now a moderator on the Ontario Real Estate chat forum as well as the Burlington, Ontario sub-forum.

Sean Kavanagh

Building Lasting Relationships and Exceeding Expectations

Category : Home Inspection Series

Home Inspection Series – Part 4: Searching out the right inspector

Tue, 13th October, 2009 - Posted by Sean Kavanagh - (0) Comment

Since anyone with a clipboard and some business cards can call themselves a home inspector, it is important to find one who is most qualified to accurately assess the various elements of a home.  It is important to do your research so you can ensure the inspector you choose is the most qualified to do the best job.    

First-time homebuyers should go to any chapter of the Canadian Association of Home & Property Inspectors when looking for a reputable inspector.  It is there that you can check on the inspectors to ensure they have some form of training.  Be careful when you read that an inspector is ‘Qualified’ as a 1 week online inspector course may cause some to feel they are ‘Qualified’.

It is always puzzling to hear stories of people willing to spend hundreds of thousands of dollars on a home and then source out the cheapest home inspector they can find or an inspector that offers the best discounts.  Trying to save a hundred dollars on the inspection could end up costing you thousands of dollars down the road on flaws or faults the ‘Qualified’ inspector failed to notice.

It is a good idea to interview home inspectors before booking an appointment.  Have them explain what they’re going to do at the inspection.  Go online and prepare a list of questions for the inspector so he knows you are wanting to be involved in the process.  This may ensure that all elements of the home are thoroughly examined.   Ask them about the length of time the inspection should take.  An inspection  should take 2.5-4 hours depending on the size of the house or condo.  Also, always ask the inspector about his insurance.  Insurance companies should only be insuring inspectors with a certain level of training.  If the inspector deems your roof to be in ‘excellent condition’ and 4 months later water is falling into your livingroom, you want to be sure you can go back the inspector and have his insurance look after the issue.

In summary:  Source out an inspector that has experience in all essential elements of the home.  Prepare a list of questions so he knows you will be involved and check to make sure he has insurance and what that insurance covers.  Interview more than a couple of inspectors, be careful when you read or hear the word ‘Qualified’ and never…I mean never, choose your home inspector because he was the cheapest!

For more information on buying or selling real estate in Burlington, Hamilton, Oakville, or Toronto Ontario, or if you have questions about current market trends, mortgages or interest rate information, please visit the Sean Kavanagh Real Estate Resource Centre at www.seansells.ca, or at www.seankavanagh.ca   I’d be happy to answer any questions to accommodate all of your real estate needs.  Follow me on TWITTER or FACEBOOK!  You can also contact me at 905-220-9198 or at www.realestatechat.ca as I am now a moderator on the Ontario Real Estate chat forum as well as the Burlington, Ontario sub-forum.

Sean Kavanagh

Building Lasting Relationships and Exceeding Expectations

Category : Home Inspection Series

Home Inspection Series – Part 5: Identify areas to increase the value of the home

Mon, 12th October, 2009 - Posted by Sean Kavanagh - (0) Comment

It is not the intended purpose of a home inspection, but the inspection might also give you some insight into potential opportunities for repairs and renovations that will not only make your home more pleasant to live in, but may also increase its value.  With the federal government’s new Home Renovation Tax Credit, you may have financial incentive to undertake some of these projects once you become a homeowner.

Unveiled Jan. 27, 2009 in the federal budget, the HRTC will provide Canadians up to $1,350 in savings for money spent on home renovations through a temporary 15% income tax credit on eligible home renovation expenditures for work performed or goods acquired up to Feb. 1, 2010. The credit can be claimed on eligible expenditures exceeding $1,000 but no more than $10,000.

Renovation costs for projects such as finishing a basement or remodeling a kitchen will be eligible for the credit, along with associated expenses such as building permits, professional services, equipment rentals and incidental expenses. Routine repairs and maintenance will not qualify for the credit. Nor will the cost of purchasing furniture, appliances, audio-visual electronics or construction equipment.

Eligible expenditures include renovating a kitchen, bathroom or basement; new carpet or hardwood floors; building an addition, deck, fence or retaining wall; a new furnace or water heater; painting the interior or exterior of a house; resurfacing a driveway; and laying new sod.

Here are some things to keep in mind when planning a change or renovation:

Think about how changes might appeal to someone buying your home in the future. For more on that, please read “Think about selling it before you buy it”.  You can make very personalized changes with paint because it is inexpensive and can easily be changed. However, items like flooring, cabinets and countertops have a longer life – make choices that will also be appealing to others.

Updating the bathrooms and kitchens in an older home can increase its resale value.

Don’t underestimate the importance of landscaping. The right planting can improve the appearance and value of your home.

Updating your exterior paint, installing new roofing, resurfacing your walkways and driveway, adding attractive mailboxes and front-yard planting can also increase value. Over time, renovations can practically pay for themselves, especially if they result in savings on utility bills, a higher selling price or years of greater comfort and enjoyment in your home.

Home inspection 101
A home inspection is a visual examination of a house and property, including: 

a thorough visual inspection of the structure (inside and out, from foundation to roof)
an examination of all major systems (Heating and Air conditioning)
an objective evaluation of the condition of more than 400 items
a printed report covering all findings and identifying potential concerns

Most appealing upgrades
Kitchen cabinet upgrade
 Hardwood floor upgrade
New windows
Removing walls to open up space
Finishing the basement
Kitchen appliance upgrade
New shingles
new bathroom taps and plumbing
new bathroom tiles
Source: AmeriSpec Home Inspection Service

For more information on buying or selling real estate in Burlington, Hamilton, Oakville, or Toronto Ontario, or if you have questions about current market trends, mortgages or interest rate information, please visit the Sean Kavanagh Real Estate Resource Centre at www.seansells.ca, or at www.seankavanagh.ca   I’d be happy to answer any questions to accommodate all of your real estate needs.  Follow me on TWITTER or FACEBOOK!  You can also contact me at 905-220-9198 or at www.realestatechat.ca as I am now a moderator on the Ontario Real Estate chat forum as well as the Burlington, Ontario sub-forum.

Sean Kavanagh

Building Lasting Relationships and Exceeding Expectations

Category : Home Inspection Series

Home Inspection Series – Part 6: Problems to ask your Inspector about

Sun, 11th October, 2009 - Posted by Sean Kavanagh - (0) Comment

When you see the following problems listed as a concern in your inspection report, be sure to ask more questions to find out how serious the problem is and how much it will cost you to remedy.  If the inspector writes “N/A”, “can’t be determined” or worse, left blank beside any of the following problems, be sure to bring a specialist in so you have a clear understanding of the extent of the issue.

Electrical problems: Almost every home has an electrical problem, some a missing ground or reverse polarity to under sized breakers and panels. Homes built before 1955 may have 60 amp services, and may not be insured by some companies until they’re upgraded. This type of outlet will have only two prongs.  Houses older than 40 years may have aluminum, or even worse, knob and tube, wiring. Insurance companies may not insure homes that contain certain types of wiring. If you really love the house, be sure to have an electrician come in to determine the amount of aluminum or knob and tube wiring. Often aluminum wiring issues can be remedied for minimal expense.

Foundation cracking: In most cases, foundation failure is a result of poor surface drainage. Look for a vertical crack eight inches in from the corners. Where there is one, there is a companion probably below grade.  Look for water stains on the sides of the crack to see if water has been seeping into the home through the crack.  It would be advisable to get a foundation expert in to provide you with a detailed report on the necessary reparations. 

Ice damming: Ice dams are responsible for clogged and damaged eavestroughs, wet insulation in the roof and walls. Wet wood, paint failure and decay will result if the problem persists.  Ensure your inspector goes on the roof to check the integrity of the roof.

Galvanized plumbing: Galvanized pipes are usually found in homes over 50 years in age. Commonly, these pipes will rust from the inside out, often restricting waterflow.  Eventually the pipe becomes blocked or bursts. Importantly, some insurance companies are now refusing to provide homeowner’s insurance on houses with this type of plumbing.

Structural problems:  Watch for over-spanned beams or poorly reinforced beams especially when a post is moved for basement renovations.   Over spanned beams can cause roofs to sag over time (especially with heavy snow accumulation) resulting in serious damage and serious expense!  If renovations have been done in the basement, ask your inspector to ensure load bearing walls were not removed or main supports compromised.  You may also run into this issue if an older home has been converted into an ‘Open Concept’ style.

Poor air barrier and insulation: Just about every home inspected requires additional caulking and insulation. The investment in caulking is returned in just a few months and additional insulation in key areas can have a ROI in less than three years.  Be sure your inspector goes up into the attic to check the level of insulation.  As most of your heat will escape through the roof, it is important to be sure you are properly insulated.

Improper venting: A major issue can be found in the bathroom.  Problems occur when vents are not vented directly outdoors. If you have a basement bathroom, ensure it is vented outside.  Sometimes basement bathrooms will be put in by the home owner without proper permits and proper venting is overlooked.
Source: Canadian Association of Home and Property Inspectors

Top 3 defects

Problems revealed by home inspections vary depending on the construction type and age of the home. Still, there are three common problems which all carry significant cost. The life-cycle of these items is approximately 20 years, at which time these systems often need to be replaced.

1. Shingles or flat roof: For energy efficiency, structural damage and, for a flat roof, snow accumulation can lead to serious damage, leakage or collapse. 

2. Furnace: For safety, energy efficiency and operating costs, ensure the age of the existing system.

3. Central air conditioning: For energy efficiency and operating costs.  As with the furnace, it is important to understand the age of all mechanical parts of the home.  If they are all at the end of their lifespan, you could be looking at significant expenses for new parts.
Source: Pappas Home Inspections Inc.

For more information on buying or selling real estate in Burlington, Hamilton, Oakville, or Toronto Ontario, or if you have questions about current market trends, mortgages or interest rate information, please visit the Sean Kavanagh Real Estate Resource Centre at www.seansells.ca, or at www.seankavanagh.ca   I’d be happy to answer any questions to accommodate all of your real estate needs.  Follow me on TWITTER or FACEBOOK!  You can also contact me at 905-220-9198 or at www.realestatechat.ca as I am now a moderator on the Ontario Real Estate chat forum as well as the Burlington, Ontario sub-forum.

Sean Kavanagh

Building Lasting Relationships and Exceeding Expectations

Category : Home Inspection Series

Home Inspection Series – Part 7: Home Inspections Gone Wrong!

Sat, 10th October, 2009 - Posted by Sean Kavanagh - (0) Comment

Home buyers hire home inspectors to help discover deficiencies in the home they are hoping to purchase.  This inspection should reveal all major issues in the home so the buyer understands the condition of the home before they purchase it.  Problems arise when buyers choose to go with the cheapest inspector they can find, don’t interview inspectors before they are hired or don’t investigate the experience of the inspector they are planning to use.  As home inspectors come from various backgrounds and there isn’t any standardization in the industry, without a proper background check, you never can be sure that the person you hire can properly assess all aspects of a home.

Here are a few examples of inspections gone wrong:

Couple A hired an inspector without interviewing any others because he came recommended from a trusted colleague and a discount was offered to the couple.  The inspector was the father of that work colleague who made the recommendation.  He claimed to have extensive experience in the field, so references were not called and a background check was not conducted.  Based on the inspection report, Couple A decided to purchase the home.  Less than 6 months later, the roof was leaking.  “Excellent Condition” was written in the inspection report under the roofing category.  When the client went into the attic to examine the roof from the inside, he could see a beam of light coming through the roof into the attic.  $7,000-$10,000 was the estimate for the reparation to the roof.

Client B purchased an old home for what she thought was ‘a great deal’ because of certain deficiencies (knob and tube, older windows, etc).  When it came time to sell the home less than 2 years later, a more thorough home inspection report conducted by the new buyers revealed 2 major issues that lead to them walking away from the deal.  1) When new duct work was intstalled (before my client bought the home), the contractor, rather than using elbow joints to go around the main floor joists, decided to cut large parts out of the joists to run the duct work compromising the integrity of the entire first floor.  2) An extension was put onto the house without proper permits (once again, before she had bought the home).  The inspection report didn’t mention anything about the extension.  The first spring saw significant volumes of water fill the basement.  When the extension was put on, it wasn’t damp proofed or sealed properly.  This may have been over looked by any inspector, but it should have been mentioned in the report so she could seek out more specialized information.  What the inspector should have noticed was how the exterior foundation wall was knocked out and not properly restored.  She still hasn’t been able to sell her home.        

These clients learned the hard way how important it is to do a bit of homework and ask a lot of questions when hiring a home inspector.  Never hire the cheapest person to inspect your largest investment and be sure to request and check references.   This is not a slight against all home inspectors, as there are plenty of great home inspectors that will provide you with the best possible inspection.  I am just hoping that you do your research and look into the experience of the inspector before you hire him.  Also, be sure to ask your inspector for his insurance and what that policy covers. 

For more information on buying or selling real estate in Burlington, Hamilton, Oakville, or Toronto Ontario, or if you have questions about current market trends, mortgages or interest rate information, please visit the Sean Kavanagh Real Estate Resource Centre at www.seansells.ca, or at www.seankavanagh.ca   I’d be happy to answer any questions to accommodate all of your real estate needs.  Follow me on TWITTER or FACEBOOK!  You can also contact me at 905-220-9198 or at www.realestatechat.ca as I am now a moderator on the Ontario Real Estate chat forum as well as the Burlington, Ontario sub-forum.

Sean Kavanagh

Building Lasting Relationships and Exceeding Expectations

Category : Home Inspection Series

Home Inspection Series – Part 8: Questions to ask prospective inspectors

Fri, 9th October, 2009 - Posted by Sean Kavanagh - (0) Comment

Now that you have bought a home and are in need of an inspection, how do you decide on who you are going to hire?  Here is a list of questions that should be asked before you decide on your home inspector.  You want to do everything you can to ensure you hire the best person for the job.  A person that you are confident will be able to identify all of the deficiencies in the home so you have a clear picture of the condition of your home. 

How long have you been conducting home inspections?

-          Someone may tell you they have been in the business for 10 years, but how many inspections were conducted in those 10 years.

What qualifications do you have?

-          As home inspection is still unregulated in Canada, consumers should ensure they are hiring an inspector who know what they are doing.  CMHC now recommends that you hire a “Registered Home Inspector” or RHI who is a member in good standing with a Provincial Association.

Can you supply me with a sample report? And will I receive a written report?

-          Verbal reports offer no recourse for the home buyer.  Always insist on a written report.  If one isn’t going to be provided, find another inspector.  A good report should contain comments specific to the subject property and should offer both observations and recommendations.  The inspector should also be able to provide you with estimates as to what expenses will be incurred when the deficiencies will be addressed.

How much time will it take?

-          A home 1800-2500 sq. ft in size should take about 2-3 hours.  If the inspection takes less than 2 hours, you should be concerned.

Can I attend the inspection?

-          If the answer is NO, you should look for another inspector.  Not only is the inspection used to identify deficiencies in the home, it is an education on the home.  You will learn about your home as you walk through the property (e.g. shut offs, furnace operation, etc.)

Do you use state of the art tools to inspect the home?

-          Are state of the art home inspection tools such as moisture meters, gas detectors, laser thermometers, thermal imaging camera, & telephoto lenses used to reduce the risk of an error.

What will be inspected?

-          The inspection should include the Roof, Exterior, Structure, Electrical, Heating, Cooling, Plumbing, Insulation and Interior. The goal is to identify any existing major problems that would affect a typical purchasers buying decision.

How much will the service cost?

-          A typical home inspection should cost $400.  Cost of the inspection should not be a factor in deciding which inspector you choose.  This is one of the most important parts of the process, so you should base your decision on who will do the best job. 

Can I see a list of references or people to call who you have previously done inspections for?

-          If they can’t or won’t provide you with a list of past clients, walk away.

Do you carry errors and omissions and general liability insurance?

-          Inspectors are human and humans make mistakes.  If the inspector misses something significant, you want to be assured you are covered.

For more information on hiring a home inspector, click this link “How to Hire a Home Inspector”

For more information on buying or selling real estate in Burlington, Hamilton, Oakville, or Toronto Ontario, or if you have questions about current market trends, mortgages or interest rate information, please visit the Sean Kavanagh Real Estate Resource Centre at www.seansells.ca, or at www.seankavanagh.ca   I’d be happy to answer any questions to accommodate all of your real estate needs.  Follow me on TWITTER or FACEBOOK!  You can also contact me at 905-220-9198 or at www.realestatechat.ca as I am now a moderator on the Ontario Real Estate chat forum as well as the Burlington, Ontario sub-forum.

Sean Kavanagh

Building Lasting Relationships and Exceeding Expectations

Category : Home Inspection Series
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